Current research

Despite the digital "revolution", the overwhelming majority of books published today are set in roman characters based on canons established in the 15th and 16th centuries. Typography appears to have proceeded by successive transitions rather than via revolution. Cutting-edge computers are equipped with centuries-old typefaces; the rapid obsolescence of computers has little effect on typography – classic faces like Garamond enjoy robust good health. The Garamond faces evoke a (largely mythical) golden age and a prestigious, although traditionalist, typography: "The revolution won’t be set in Garamond" (Slanted, nº 11, 2010). Despite Garamond's long history and its multiple reinterpretations, it continues to spark creative efforts today.

Despite Garamond's long history and its multiple reinterpretations, it continues to spark creative efforts today.

Sabon, designed by Jan Tschichold in 1964, was renewed by Jean-François Porchez who created Sabon Next (2002), which was enlivened and freed from pre-digital technical imperatives. In 2000, Font Bureau published a Garamond that was tight, lively and contrasted, with a decidedly contemporary look; it was designed by Jill Pichotta based on Garamond Ludlow. Some Garamonds quote the original by taking a certain amount of distance, such as the 1592 GLC Garamond (2010), which revisited the modèle Egenolff-Berner model by integrating the printing defects of the period. There is also TYMA Garamont, an interpretation of a Swedish Garamond designed by Henry Alm in 1948. It is now technically quite easy to design characters, and an Internet search reveals an Irish uncial version (Celtic Garamond, 2000), a serif-free Garamond (Gara, 2005), a stencil Garamond (Becker Garamond Stencil, 2007), an ornamented Garamond (DTC Garamond, among others), and a left-leaning Garamond (Garamond Lefty, 2006). These designs are of varying quality.

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