Garamond in contemporary publishing

Garamond is the unrivalled typeface for running text, and is still used extensively by French publishers. It is something of a monument, embodying the timelessness of the texts it conveys in the Pléiade series published by Gallimard. Since its creation in 1931 by Jacques Schiffrin, the Bibliothèque de la Pléiade is personified by Deberny & Peignot's Garamont unwaveringly set in 9-point type. This symbolic aspect can also be seen in Pierre Faucheux's design of the four-volume Histoire de l’édition française (Cercle de la librairie, 1989-1991), under the direction of Roger Chartier and Henri-Jean Martin. The Imprimerie Nationale's Garamont – among the institution's other typefaces – is also used by the Atelier du livre d'art, whose productions bring together the very best typographic and print-making techniques.

Garamond is the unrivalled typeface for running text, and is still used extensively by French publishers. Many publishers avail themselves of the vast range of Garamond interpretations to set their publications apart.

Many publishers avail themselves of the vast range of Garamond interpretations to set their publications apart. This is the case with Actes Sud, which uses Garamond (ITCgaramond and Agaramond), according to the head editors, "for its nobility and the generosity of its design, which makes for a pleasant and fluid reading experience." The Allia publishing house uses it exclusively, "for its beauty, its richness and its legibility," allied with an uncluttered graphic style that underscores the rigour of essays and analyses providing a radical critique of contemporary society. Smaller houses are not exempt, such as Monsieur Toussaint-Louverture in Toulouse, which publishes literary gems, both novels and short stories, in the finely-carved Garamond of Robert Slimbach.